Fireitup Foods LLC

WELCOME TO FIREITUP FOODS! 

In the world of firefighting, a flashover is an instantaneous eruption. With New Orleans Original Firehouse Flashover Creole Seasoning, that is exactly what you get…an instantaneous eruption of flavor! Taken directly from my special firehouse recipe, this blend has just the right amount of savory zest and subtle heat to be your “go-to” spice in the kitchen or on the outdoor grill. Try it on chicken, seafood, pork, beef, salads and anything else where you want to capture that unique New Orleans Creole taste!

Featuring the finest quality spices, New Orleans Original Firehouse Flashover Creole Seasoning is an all-natural low-sodium blend of garlic, onion, cayenne, pepper, oregano and other spices. Compare it to other blends that contain as much as 19% sodium. Flashover Seasoning may cost a few pennies more but promises to be packed with flavor and not salty fillers. A private label recipe produced by Deep South Blenders in New Orleans, Louisiana.

So try it for yourself. I am sure that once you do, you and your family will love it. I fed it to hungry firefighters for nearly a quarter of a century and never had a complaint. Trust me…that is saying something! - Robert Medina 

 

Robert Medina, a retired New Orleans Firefighter and author of “If You Can’t Stand the Heat…A New Orleans Firefighters Cookbook” developed Firehouse Flashover Creole Seasoning over 30 years ago. He used it to create many meals during his 24 years on the NOFD. You can visit his author page at http://fireitup.tateauthor.com.

Firehouse Flashover Creole Seasoning is a Certified Product of Louisiana

 

Firehouse Flashover Creole Seasoning is a Certified Product of Louisiana.

Recent Posts

Cajun Deep Fried Turkey

It’s that time of year again! Be sure to check out the SAFE way to deep fry your turkey this Holiday Season! Check out the video and recipe below.

CAJUN DEEP FRIED TURKEY RECIPE

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 10- to 13-pound turkey (thawed, rinsed, and patted dry)
  • 16-ounce bottle of Cajun butter flavor injector
  • 1 can of turkey gravy
  • 1 stick of melted butter
  • 1 tablespoon of Flashover Creole Seasoning (or your favorite Creole seasoning)
  • Peanut oil
  • Turkey fryer
  • Propane gas burner and bottle
  • Submersible thermometer (usually comes with the fryer and the fryer stand)

People are always talking about the difficulties you can encounter when frying a turkey. They also talk about the fact that if you eat a fried one, you’ll never go back to baked. Another firemen friend of mine named Tony Palisi, who has sadly left us, lived across the street from me. He was one of my converts from baked turkeys. The first time I fried one for him and his family, I got to ask him the next day how they liked it. He said when he last saw his kids they were sucking on the bones. Enough said!

There is no danger in turkey frying as long as you remember to do it outside away from your house, and don’t overfill the oil. People have a tendency to fill it up, heat the oil, and then put in a turkey. The oil spills over, and they burn down the neighborhood. There is a simple way to avoid this. Whatever the size of your turkey fryer, put in the largest turkey you are going to fry (we usually fry multiple turkeys in the same oil). Fill the fryer with water until it just about covers the turkey (just leave the tip of the leg bones sticking out). Pull out the turkey and let it drain. The water level will drop. Mark that spot on the inside of your fryer. That is the oil level you will fill up to the next day when you fry. Pour out the water and dry out your fryer. Now you know how much peanut oil to put in without overflowing the pot. It also should be noted that you should only use peanut oil. We have tried this with less expensive oils, and it doesn’t work out or taste the same as it does with peanut oil. If the expense is too much, fry a couple for the neighbors and split the cost. They will love you for it. The only drawback to this is that you will be frying for them every year after that, so be prepared. Also, before you throw the turkey wrapper away, make sure you know how much it weighs. You will need that bit of info when it comes to the timing of the cooking of your bird.

Put the Cajun butter flavor sauce, the butter, the Flashover Creole Seasoning, and the turkey gravy into a saucepan. Heat them up and whisk them into a sauce mixture. Let it cool down, and then use the injector to inject your sauce into as many of the turkey muscles as you can. Inject the wings, legs, thighs, and breasts in as many spots as you can until you run out of sauce. Now place your turkey into a couple of plastic garbage bags and seal it up. That way nothing will spill out into your fridge while the turkey marinates overnight.

When it is time to fry, fill the fryer with peanut oil up to the line you found the day before. Put the pot on the burner, and start up your fire. Place the thermometer inside and make sure that you can read it at all times. The thermometer should have a clip that will allow you to attach it to the side of the fryer pot. Get your oil up to 300 degrees, and its ready.

While the oil is getting hot, you want to take your turkey out of the fridge and mount it. There will be a flat stand with a long rod attached. Slide your turkey, with the legs facing up, over the rod through the turkey cavity. The loop at the top of the rod is used to lower the turkey into the oil. When the temperature is right, slowly lower the turkey with the hook into the hot oil. Be very careful because it will splatter a bit. Once it is in the oil, crank up the heat until it comes back up to 300 degrees. Now turn the fire down low and check your watch.

I have heard of a thousand different ways to do this, but trust me this is the best way. Making sure you always keep the temperature at 300 degrees, you cook the turkey for three and one-half minutes per pound. Period! No three minutes per pound at 350 degrees. No two minutes per pound at 375 degrees.

Just do it this way, and your turkey will be cooked perfectly inside as well as have a golden brown color on the outside. For some reason I have seen people cook them until they are black on the outside, and there is no sense in that. I have cooked hundreds of turkeys in this way, and in my humble opinion, this is the best way to do it.

When the time is up, pull the turkey up to drain, and then remove the turkey to a pan that is lined with paper towels. This will absorb the excess oil after frying. That’s about it. You will now be a convert. I guarantee it!

Note: Peanut oil can be strained and put back into its container for use at another time. It will probably look like used motor oil, but once you thoroughly strain it, it can be used again to fry more birds at later dates. I like to start over with fresh oil every time, but I have seen firemen use the same oil for quite a few frying sessions before opening their wallets to buy more. Hey, we’re underpaid—what can I say?

Another note: Try to use only turkeys that weigh between ten and thirteen pounds. Anything larger than that are usually tough, and besides that, they probably won’t fit into the average-sized fryer.

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